Why taking a holiday from work is good for your career

We picked out this article from the Guardian Newspaper careers blog. It's an easy read with a few good take away points that are well worth putting into your work plan. We've summarised it here.

For most people, summer is synonymous with sunshine and taking time off. But as you reach the end of the year, you might find yourself wondering how you'll fit in all of your paid holiday days. A lot of us don’t give ourselves the breaks we need and deserve.

Not taking proper holidays may seem harmless at the time, or even helpful to your career, but be warned: it can also be damaging. Evidence shows you become less productive without proper breaks. When people work longer hours, they're not as creative and can't maintain the same intensity level. Less is more sometimes!

It’s better to think of a career as more of a marathon than a sprint, so taking a holiday is essential for survival. Don’t be concentrating on “the big one”. It makes loads of sense to take shorter breaks throughout the year, long enough to get proper R&R and return to work in better shape physically & more importantly, mentally.

It's important not to rely on your boss to manage your breaks, especially if you're part of a large team. No one knows how you're feeling better than you.

Qualified psychologist, Emma Kenny, says: "If you have a great manager then they will force you to take your entitled leave. If you have the boss from hell, then nothing you can do will be enough." If you’ve the boss from hell, you should think about sorting that out!
It's not only your work and mental health that could suffer from not taking proper breaks. Marriages can breakdown due to people working excessive hours. People taking work home can also put strain on the ability to spend time with family and friends. Many of the smarter employers place a lot of emphasis on work-life balance.
Whether it's fear of missing out on opportunities or simply losing touch, people still can't seem to switch off when they finally do take leave.
The rise of mobile technology doesn’t help. 
Having to maintain office contact while away with family or friends can trigger negative feelings towards your boss or workplace. But there are a few things you can do to find out what's expected of you while you're off, and also keep any contact that is required to a minimum.

The key is planning ahead and communication:

  • Have the conversation as early as possible before you're due to take a break, and talk about what is expected in terms of checking in while you're away.

  • When you join a new company, find out the busiest times of year, and trying to align your time off around them, to help you feel you really can switch off. Asking what is expected of you while you're away can also help to ease the tension around going away, and put your mind at rest while you kick back and relax.

  • If you've a lull at work, and you're flexible, why not take an impromtu break if you can, even if it's just a long weekend? It'll leave you in better fettle for when your back's to the wall.


The world keeps on turning, whether you’re in the office or not! It’s a very valuable discipline to take the time periodically to think about your wellbeing and plan accordingly. The benefits can be immediate.

For the full article, click on our photo of John from Zen SUP!

 

 

 

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Why taking a holiday from work is good for your career

April 3, 2017

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